Overview

Thibaut D’hulst focuses on intellectual property law, new technologies, data protection, pharmaceutical law and competition law.

Thibaut regularly advises clients on all aspects of intellectual property law. His experience ranges from advising on strategies to protect trademarks, databases and other intellectual property to litigation, including patent validity and enforcement cases. He also regularly assists clients in new technology projects in relation to compliance with intellectual property, data protection and/or pharmaceutical laws. 

In addition, Thibaut is a certified Data Protection Officer and assists clients in complying with EU and Belgian data protection rules by conducting data protection audits, drafting company policies, information clauses and processor agreements on data protection, filing notifications, assisting clients in procedures before data protection authorities and advising on the international transfer of personal data.

In the field of competition law, Thibaut’s experience includes compliance training, assisting clients during and after dawn raids, advising on data protection aspects of competition procedures and on litigation concerning damages proceedings.

Languages

Dutch, English, French, German

Recommendations

  • Chambers Europe - Data Protection (Associates to watch)

Education

  • Queen Mary, University of London, LL.M. in Intellectual Property Law, 2006

  • University of Leuven, Postgraduate degree in Business Economics, 2005

  • University of Leuven, Master of Laws, 2004

  • University of Namur, Bachelor of Law, 2001


Bar Admission

Brussels

Publications and insights

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    • 31/03/2020
    • Articles

    Data Protection Authorities Provide Guidance on Processing of Personal Data in Context of COVID-19 Outbreak

    The outbreak of the new Corona virus COVID-19 has caused various emergencies with novel challenges for many organisations collecting and processing personal data, such as: • Employers monitor employees working from home; request employees and visitors to report risk factors such as travelling or exposure to people with flu-like symptoms; may need to report that an employee is infected with COVID-19 to other employees; • physicians and pharmaceutical companies may wish to use data to investigate new treatments; • authorities enforce lockdown measures by video cameras and tracking phones; and • health authorities need detailed test results and other health data to map virus spreads and keep detailed statistics.

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    • 12/03/2020
    • Articles

    European Commission Presents Digital Strategy on Data and Artificial Intelligence

    On 19 February 2020, the European Commission published its white paper on artificial intelligence (AI) – “A European approach to excellence and trust” (the White Paper). According to the White Paper, in simple terms, AI is a collection of technologies that combine data, algorithms and computing power for the benefit of citizens, businesses and the public interest in general. In essence, the White Paper sets out policy options on how to achieve a balance between encouraging the uptake of AI while addressing the associated risks through potential regulation. On the same day as the publication of its white paper on artificial intelligence, the European Commission unveiled a new European data strategy. With this five-year plan, the Commission wants to create a single European data space, which is a single market for data that will be open to data from across the world. The European data strategy and the white paper on artificial intelligence are the first pillars of broader policy initiatives that involve a digital strategy and a framework for the development of Artificial Intelligence.

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    • 04/03/2020
    • Articles

    EDPB Urges Companies to Conduct Data Protection Assessment Ahead of Merger

    The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) has issued a statement on the privacy implications of mergers in view of Google LLC’s intention to acquire Fitbit, Inc. The EDPB is concerned that Google would gain too much control over people’s health and wellness data potentially leading to an unfair advantage over other companies.

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