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Van Bael & Bellis authors Belgium chapter of Private Antitrust Litigation Global Guide

  • 27/09/2016
  • Articles

Thompson Reuters Practical Law have published their Private Antitrust Litigation Global Guide which features a chapter on Belgium authored by Van Bael & Bellis partners Peter L’Ecluse and Martin Favart and associate Lucas Vanassche. The Guide provides an overview of various aspects of private antitrust litigation and aims to be a first point of reference for those considering the merits of commencing, defending or settling antitrust claims. 

The Belgium chapter can be accessed here.

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