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Brexit Implications for Data Protection in 8 Questions after the end of Brexit transition

  • 17/11/2020
  • Articles

The end of the Brexit transition period is only six weeks away and from that moment on, the GDPR will no longer be applicable in the UK and the UK will be considered a third country. Brexit continues to raise many legal questions and uncertainties, not least for the protection of personal data which flows between the UK and the rest of Europe. Will organisations in the UK still have to comply with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)? Can they still transfer personal data to the EU? Will they need to appoint a representative in the EU? And what will happen with the one-stop-shop?
 
On the basis of eight frequently asked questions, we provide an overview of issues to consider and steps to take in order to be compliant with data protection rules during and after the transition period.

Please read our Q&A on the topic. 

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