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Quentin Declève and Margot Vogels author article on first CJEU ruling on European Account Preservation Order (“EAPO”)

  • 30/03/2020
  • News

An article on the European Account Preservation Order (“EAPO”) co-authored by Van Bael & Bellis associates Quentin Declève and Margot Vogels has been published in the latest issue of the Belgian Commercial Law Journal (Tijdschrift voor Belgisch Handelsrecht / Revue de Droit commercial belge). The article focuses on a CJEU judgment of 7 November 2019 (C-555/18), which interpreted, for the first time, key concepts contained in the EAPO Regulation. The article also aims to demonstrate how the CJEU struck a balance between the interests of creditors and debtors in the context of cross-border debt recovery in civil and commercial matters.

 

The article is available here.

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